June 10, 2008

The United States and the Failure of Nation Building in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Central Asia

Ahmed Rashid (Author and Journalist)

The growing instability and resurgence of Islamic extremism in Afghanistan and Pakistan pose a great threat to U.S. interests and global security. In his new book, Descent into Chaos, Ahmed Rashid examines the rising insurgency, booming opium trade, and weak governance in Afghanistan, concluding that U.S. strategy in the region has been a complete failure.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


June 6, 2008

Kafka Comes to America: Fighting for Justice in the War on Terror

Steven Wax (U.S. Federal Public Defender, District of Oregon)

A talk by Steven Wax, one of seven Oregon lawyers who volunteered to defend detainees in Guantanamo Bay. In his twenty-nine years as a public defender, Wax had never had to warn a client that he or she might be taken away to a military brig, or worse, a "black site", one of our country's dreaded secret prisons. Wax’s new book, Kafka Comes to America, reveals where and how our civil liberties have been eroded in favor of a false security, and how each of us can make a difference.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


May 15, 2008

Innocents Lost: When Child Soldiers Go to War

Jimmie Briggs (Journalist and Teacher)

In his book Innocents Lost: When Child Soldiers Go to War, Jimmie Briggs book provides a vitally important perspective on the global tragedy of child soldiers. More than 250,000 children have fought in three dozen conflicts around the world. From the "little bees"" of Colombia to the "baby brigades" of Sri Lanka, the subject of child soldiers is changing the face of terrorism.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


May 9, 2008

Is Development Sustainable? Not Even Close

Robert Repetto (Professor in the Practice of Economics and Sustainable Development, Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies)

This talk addresses how major trends are heading straight toward ecological and human disasters. If they are not changed and changed soon, development efforts will fail for billions of people, comprising mainly the world’s most vulnerable populations. This event was the keynote address for "Is Development Sustainable?", a conference in honor of Ted Steck's retirement. In 1994, Ted Steck founded the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Chicago.


April 28, 2008

Superclass: The Global Power Elite and the World They are Making

David Rothkopf (President and Chief Executive, Garten Rothkopf)

David Rothkopf’s new book, “Superclass,” provides the first in-depth examination of the connections between the global communities of leaders who are at the helm of every major enterprise on the planet and control its greatest wealth. It is an unprecedented examination of the trends within the superclass, which are likely to alter our politics, our institutions, and the shape of the world in which we live.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


April 22, 2008

Pens and Swords: How the American Mainstream Media Report the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Marda Dunsky (National/Foreign Desk Editor, Chicago Tribune)

As world attention is renewed and refocused on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict at the sixtieth anniversary of its seminal year of 1948, Marda Dunsky takes a close look at how more than two dozen major American print and broadcast outlets have reported the conflict in recent years.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.

 


April 15, 2008

The Next Great Clash

Michael Levin (Author)

In The Next Great Clash, Michael Levin presents evidence of a global political order on the verge of a historic power shift from West to East. A reemerging China is the only nation with the latent capacity to challenge American hegemony, and Levin demonstrates that such challenges to the status quo usually lead to war.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


April 10, 2008

Muslim Peace Building in Conflict Regions of Southeast Asia

Kikue Hamayotsu (Assistant Professor of Political Science, Northern Illinois University)
Kriya Lanputeh (Yala Islamic University)
Abdulghoni Suetair (Prince of Songkla University)
Pattama Hamingma (Asian Muslim Action Network and Asian Resource Foundation)
Shahana Abdulwahid Institute for Islamic Studies, University of the Philippines)
Minalang Barapantao (Mindanao State University)

This panel gives a historical overview of the situation in southern Thailand and southern Philippines, followed by a discussion on peace building efforts in conflict regions. Panelists also give special attention to welfare and security issues in these areas.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


March 20, 2008

The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order

Parag Khanna (Director of the Global Governance Initiative of the American Strategy Program, New America Foundation.)

In his new book, “The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order,” Parag Khanna examines the intersection of geopolitics and globalization to argue that America's dominant moment has been suddenly replaced by a geopolitical marketplace wherein the European Union and China compete with the United States to shape world order on their own terms.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


March 6, 2008

The Closing of the ICTY and its Effect on Justice and Accountability in the Former Yugoslavia

M. Cherif Bassiouni (Distinguished Research Professor of Law at DePaul University College of Law)
Gordana Igric (Regional Network Director, Balkan Investigative Reporting Network)
Shireen Avis Fisher (International Judge to the War Crimes Chamber of Bosnia & Herzegovina)

This panel discussion explores how the impending closing of the International Criminal Tribune for the Former Yuglosavia (ICTY) will affect justice and accountability in the Balkans, including: the integration of international human rights standards on a national level, the challenges and opportunities confronting the domestic courts and the role of the media/civil society.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


March 4, 2008

The Sixth Anniversary of the Gujarat Riots

Shabnam Hashmi (Managing Trustee and Executive Secretary, Act Now for Harmony and Democracy)

Shabnam Hashmi’s talk covers the aftermath of the Gujarat Riots in 2002. The Gujarat violence was a series of communal riots that took place in the Indian State of Gujarat from February to May 2002, involving violence between Hindus and Muslims. Official estimates of the death toll tabled in the Indian parliament reported 790 Muslims and 254 Hindus killed, as well as 223 people missing and 2,548 injured.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


February 28, 2008

Displacement Week: Forum on the University of Chicago and Hyde Park/Kenwood/Woodlawn

Susan Campbell (University of Chicago Office of Community Affairs)
Bryan Echols (MAGIC)
Mattie Butler (Woodlawn East Community and Neighbors)

The purpose of Displacement Week is to engage the University of Chicago and Hyde Park/Kenwood/Woodlawn communities with issues around the displacement of people for economic development. This panel examines the connection between displacement caused by global and local economic development processes, such as the proliferation of Special Economic Zones and the rapid expansion of gentrification.


February 20, 2008

Immigrant Organizations in the U.S.: Opportunities and Challenges

Oscar Chacón (Executive Director, National Alliance of Latin American & Caribbean Communities)

A talk by Oscar Chacón, Executive Director of the National Alliance of Latin American & Caribbean Communities (NALACC).


February 1, 2008

Military Inc.: Inside Pakistan's Military Economy

Ayesha Siddiqa (Independent Political Analyst)

Pakistan has emerged as a strategic ally of the US in the 'war on terror'. It is the third largest receiver of US aid in the world, but it also serves as a breeding ground for fundamentalist groups. How long can the relationship between the US and Pakistan continue? This book shows how Pakistan is an unusual ally for the US in that it is a military state, controlled by its army. The Pakistan military not only defines policy - it is entrenched in the corporate sector and controls the country's largest companies. So Pakistan's economic base, its companies and its main assets, are in the hands of a tiny minority of senior army officials. This merging of the military and corporate sectors has powerful consequences. Ayesha Siddiqa's book, "Military Inc." analyses the internal and external dynamics of this gradual power-building and its larger impact that it is having on Pakistan's relationship with the United States and the wider world.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


January 28, 2008

Poverty and Income Inequality in Brazil

Ricardo Paes de Barros (University of Chicago Tinker Visiting Professor in Latin American Studies)

This lecture stems from a 2006 IPEA report on the "Recent Fall in Income Inequality in Brazil". This report sought to consolidate the recent and dramatic decline in income inequality in Brazil, evaluate its impact and relevance, identify its main determinants, and finally to draft public policy recommendations so that the decline in income inequality could continue, or even increase, in coming years.

This is part of the Latin American Briefing Series.


January 26, 2008

New Partnership Paradoxes in U.S.-China Relations

Sun Zhe (Director, Center for U.S.-China Relations, Tsinghua University)

Professor Sun identifies three new "partnership paradoxes" in U.S.-China relations: Trade, Taiwan and Democracy. (1) China and the U.S. today are traversing an economic glacier of mutual interdependence and they have to depend on each other much more than either would probably choose; (2) Taiwan has become the most critical issue that constitutes an interlocking web of misperceptions which may lead to a potentially explosive relationship between the U.S. and China; and (3) The Chinese model of development has attracted the world's attention and has led to questions such as whether democracy "made in China" is also possible. In dealing with these new partnership paradoxes, the U.S. and China should seek consensus and to define principles and work out proper policies.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


January 25, 2008

Cows, Cars and Cycle-Rickshaws: The Politics of Nature on the Streets of Delhi

Amita Baviskar (Associate Professor at the Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi University)

As an embodied public sphere, city streets are sites for multiple exchanges between differently located people and things. This talk focuses on cows, cars and cycle-rickshaws as they navigate Delhi's roads, and on the people who own, use and seek to control them. All three have been the subject of strenuous efforts at regulation by courts, citizens' groups and traders' associations. Professor Bavkiskar interprets these conflicts as instances of bourgeois environmentalism, the (mainly) middle-class pursuit of urban order, hygiene and safety, and ecological conservation. She argues that collective action in the "public interest" by "citizens" concerned about congestion and the collapse of civic infrastructure constitutes a public that excludes the city's poorer sections. The talk examines state attempts to regulate the traffic between cars, cows and rickshaws, and concludes by arguing that complex interdependencies avert imminent collision and enable "the republic of the street"" to survive.


January 23, 2008

Human Rights in Mexico: Inside the Labyrinth of Drugs, Elections and Billionaires

Sergio Aguayo (Professor of Political Science, Colegio de Mexico)

Sergio Aguayo has been one of Mexico's leading public intellectuals and human rights advocates for the past three decades.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


January 14, 2008

The Mind of the Market

Michael Shermer (Author and Psychologist)

Michael Shermer explains how evolution shaped the modern economy-and why people are so irrational about money. How did we make the leap from ancient hunter-gatherers to modern consumers and traders? Why do people get so emotional and irrational about bottom-line financial and business decisions? Is the capitalist marketplace a sort of Darwinian organism, evolved through natural selection as the fittest way to satisfy our needs? In this eye-opening exploration, author and psychologist Michael Shermer uncovers the evolutionary roots of our economic behavior. Drawing on the new field of neuroeconomics, Shermer investigates what brain scans reveal about bargaining, snap purchases, and establishing trust in business. He scrutinizes experiments in behavioral economics to understand why people hang on to losing stocks, why negotiations disintegrate into tit-for-tat disputes, and why money does not make us happy. He brings together astonishing findings from psychology, biology, and other sciences to describe how our tribal ancestry makes us suckers for brands, why researchers believe cooperation unleashes biochemicals similar to those released during sex, why free trade promises to build alliances between nations, and how even capuchin monkeys get indignant if they don't get a fair reward for their work.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


November 15, 2007

China's Brave New World and Other Tales for Global Times

Jeffrey Wasserstrom (Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine)

If Chairman Mao came back to life today, what would he think of Nanjing's bookstore, the "Librairie Avant-Garde", where it is easier to find primers on Michel Foucault's philosophy than copies of the Little Red Book? What does it really mean to order a latte at Starbucks in Beijing? Is it possible that Aldous Huxley wrote a novel even more useful than Orwell's 1984 for making sense of post-Tiananmen China...or post-9/11 America? In these often playful, always enlightening "tales", Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom poses these and other questions as he journeys from 19th-century China into the future, and from Shanghai to Chicago, St. Louis, and Budapest. He argues that simplistic views of China and Americanization found in most soundbite-driven media reports serve us poorly as we try to understand China's place in the current world order...or our own.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


November 1, 2007

The Oil and Glory

Steven LeVine (Journalist and Author)

Pipeline politics became a modern day version of the 19th Century's Great Game, in which Britain and Russia had employed cunning and bluff to gain supremacy over the lands of the Caucasus and Central Asia. Steven LeVine’s new book, “The Oil and Glory”, is the story of how, at the dawn of the 21st century, the game was played once more across the harsh environs of the Caspian Sea.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


October 30, 2007

The Talibanization of South Asia: Can it Be Stopped?

Pervez Hoodbhoy (Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University)

Dr. Pervez Hoodbhoy received his bachelor's degrees in electrical engineering and mathematics, master's in solid state physics, and Ph.D in nuclear physics, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has been a faculty member at the Department of Physics, Quaid-e-Azam University, Islamabad since 1973. He is chairman of Mashal, a non-profit organization that publishes books in Urdu on women's rights, education, environmental issues, philosophy, and modern thought. Dr. Hoodbhoy has written and spoken extensively on topics ranging from science in Islam to education issues in Pakistan and nuclear disarmament. He produced a 13-part documentary series in Urdu for Pakistan Television on critical issues in education, and two other major television series aimed at popularizing science. He is author of Islam and Science: Religious Orthodoxy and the Battle for Rationality, now in 5 languages

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


October 26, 2007

Beyond the Green Zone: Dispatches from an Unembedded Journalist in Occupied Iraq

Dahr Jamail (Independent Journalist)

As the occupation of Iraq unravels, the demand for independent reporting is growing. Since 2003, unembedded journalist Dahr Jamail has filed indispensable reports from Iraq that have made him this generation's chronicler of the unfolding disaster there. In these collected dispatches, Jamail presents never-before-published details of the siege of Fallujah and examines the origins of the Iraqi insurgency. Dahr Jamail makes frequent visits to Iraq and has published his accounts in newspapers and magazines worldwide. He has regularly appeared on Democracy Now!, as well as the BBC, Pacifica Radio, and numerous other networks.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


 

October 17, 2007

Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror

David Cole (Professor of Law, Georgetown University)

David Cole speaks on his new book, "Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror," coauthored by Jules Lobel. In their critique, two of the country's preeminent constitutional scholars argue that the great irony is that the Bush administration's sacrifices in the rule of law, adopted in the name of prevention, have in fact made us more susceptible to future terrorist attacks. They debunk the administration's claim that it is winning the war on terror and offer an alternative strategy in which the rule of law is an asset, not an obstacle, in the struggle to keep us both safe and free.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


October 2, 2007

Legal Defense and Human Rights in Russia

Robert Amsterdam (Founding Partner, Amsterdam & Peroff)

Robert R Amsterdam is a founding partner of Amsterdam & Peroff, a Toronto based international law firm with affiliated offices in Paris, Miami and Beijing. In practice since 1980, Mr. Amsterdam has extensive experience litigating and arbitrating corporate disputes in emerging markets, focusing on the areas of individual and corporate human rights. Mr. Amsterdam was retained by Mikhail Khodorkovsky in August, 2003 as part of the YUKOS-Group MENATEP defense team. Since then, he has worked with Russian human rights lawyers to prepare a White Paper on international human rights issues as they relate to the prosecution of Platon Lebedev, Alexei Pichugin and Mr. Khodorkovsky.

The World Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


October 1, 2007

In Defense of Academic Freedom

Tariq Ali (Editor, Verso Books and New Left Review)
Akeel Bilgrami (Columbia University)
Noam Chomsky (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Tony Judt (New York University)
John J. Mearsheimer (University of Chicago)
Norman Finkelstein (formerly of DePaul University)
Neve Gordon (Ben-Gurion University)
Mehrene Larudee (DePaul University)
Evan Lorendo/strong> (DePaul Academic Freedom Committee)

Two panels on academic freedom, chaired by Tariq Ali, editor of Verso Books and New Left Review. The growing evidence of outside interference in the hiring process at universities and the recent tenure denials at DePaul University, has prompted leading scholars across the nation to begin to speak out in defense of academic freedom. The DePaul University Academic Freedom Committee, Verso Books, and Diskord Journal sponsored a public symposium held in Rockefeller Chapel at the University of Chicago.


September 27, 2007

The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy

John J. Mearsheimer (Professor of Political Science, University of Chicago)
Stephen M. Walt (Professor of International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University)

"The Israel Lobby" was originally published in the London Review of Books in March 2006. It provoked both howls of outrage and cheers of gratitude for challenging what had been a taboo issue in America: the impact of the Israel lobby on U.S. foreign policy. In their new book, “The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy,” Mearsheimer and Walt deepen and expand their argument and confront recent developments in Lebanon and Iran.

The World Beyond The Headlines is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.