May 17, 2007

The Modern Human Rights Movement in Mexico

Mariclaire Acosta (Organization of American States)

A talk by Mariclaire Acosta. Acosta is affiliated with the Organization of American States, co-founder of the Academia Mexicana de Derechos Humanos; founder, Comision Mexicana para la Promocion y Defensa de los Derechos Humanos, and former director of Human Rights in the Secretaria de Relaciones Exteriores. This is part of the Human rights in Mexico Series.


May 15, 2007

The Atomic Bazaar: The Rise of the Nuclear Poor

William Langewiesche (Journalist)

In his book The Atomic Bazaar, Langewiesche investigates the burgeoning global threat of nuclear weapons production. As more unstable and undeveloped nations find ways of acquiring the ultimate arms, the stakes of state-sponsored nuclear activity have soared to frightening heights. Even more disturbing is the likelihood of such weapons being manufactured and deployed by guerrilla non-state terrorists. Langewiesche also recounts the recent history of Abdul Qadeer Khan and examines in dramatic and tangible detail the chances for nuclear terrorism. The World Beyond The Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


May 9, 2007

The Clash Within: Democracy, Religious Violence, and India's Future

Martha Nussbaum (Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics, University of Chicago)

While America is focused on religious militancy and terrorism in the Middle East, democracy has been under siege from religious extremism in another critical part of the world. As Martha Nussbaum reveals in her new book, “The Clash Within,” the forces of the Hindu right pose a disturbing threat to India's democratic traditions and secular state. The World Beyond The Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


May 9, 2007

Colonialism, Militarism, and the Political Economy of Transracial Adoption

Emi Koyama (Social Justice Activist)

Part of the Japan at Chicago Lecture Series: Celebrating Protest.


May 4, 2007

Roundtable Discussion on U.S.-Cuban Academic Exchange

Alan Kolata (Anthropology, University of Chicago)
Shannon Dawdy (Anthropology, University of Chicago)
Stephan Palmié (Anthropology, University of Chicago)
Agnes Lugo-Ortiz (Romance Languages and Literature, University of Chicago)
Laurie Frederik (Anthropology, University of Chicago)
Paul Ryer (Anthropology, University of Chicago)

U.S. and Cuban scholars involved in academic, scientific, and cultural research face significant difficulties in maintaining open and thorough dialogue with each other due to restrictions governing travel between the two countries. Such exchanges, however, hold the potential for improved interpretations of our economic, cultural, and historical ties, and ultimately for improved political relations. The aim of this conference was to convene scholars, practitioners, and members of civil society in order to foster a broad, interdisciplinary discussion on the current conditions of U.S.-Cuban academic exchange, the challenges that new governmental restrictions pose to academic research agendas, and the manners by which scholars may engage in projects related to the history, economics, public policy, and culture of Cuba.


May 4, 2007

The Politics of U.S.-Cuban Exchanges

Wayne Smith (Center for International Policy)
Louis Pérez, (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

U.S. and Cuban scholars involved in academic, scientific, and cultural research face significant difficulties in maintaining open and thorough dialogue with each other due to restrictions governing travel between the two countries. Such exchanges, however, hold the potential for improved interpretations of our economic, cultural, and historical ties, and ultimately for improved political relations. The aim of this conference was to convene scholars, practitioners, and members of civil society in order to foster a broad, interdisciplinary discussion on the current conditions of U.S.-Cuban academic exchange, the challenges that new governmental restrictions pose to academic research agendas, and the manners by which scholars may engage in projects related to the history, economics, public policy, and culture of Cuba.


May 3, 2007

The Fifteen-Woman Lawsuit Opposing the Self-Defense Forces in Iraq

Michiko Nakajima (Attorney)

In the course of the Iraq War, citizens in Japan, singly or in groups, have been taking the state to court alleging violation of the "no war" clause of the Constitution in deploying Self-Defense Force troops. Feminist labor lawyer Michiko Nakajima led a group of 15 women plaintiffs in one such suit. This endeavor builds on her half-century of activism engaging with many of the great struggles of postwar Japan, from the US-Japan Security Treaty, gender equality in the workplace, and the Women's Tribunal on Military Sexual Slavery.


May 3, 2007

Labor Rights: The Case of Ciudad Juarez

Bertha Lujan (Secretaria del Trabajo, Gobierno "Legitimo" de México)

A talk by Bertha Lujan, Secretaria del Trabajo, Gobierno "Legitimo" de México (de Andrés Manuel López Obrador), former Controlora, Cd. de México (2000-2006), and lead organizer of Frente Auténtico del Trabajo.


April 27, 2007

Failing America's Faithful: How Today's Churches are Mixing God with Politics and Losing Their Way

Kathleen Kennedy Townsend (Former Lieutenant Governor of Maryland)
Susan Thistlethwaite (President, Chicago Theological Seminary)

In her book Failing America's Faithful, Kathleen Kennedy Townsend issues a spiritual call to arms to those who feel like her that today's churches—Catholic and Protestant alike—are failing to promote the welfare of those who depend upon them. After recounting her personal story in one of the most prominent Catholic families in America, she shows how America's neediest are now forgotten while their churches fight political battles against abortion rights and homosexual marriages. She provides hope through powerful examples of individuals effecting change and maintains that our individual actions can return our churches to their traditional role as shepherds to their flock. The Word Beyond The Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


April 19, 2007

Buried in the Bitter Waters: The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America

Elliot Jaspin (Journalist)

Based on nearly a decade of painstaking research in archives and census records, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Elliot Jaspin's book Buried in the Bitter Waters provides irrefutable evidence that racial cleansing occurred again and again on American soil, and fundamentally reshaped the geography of race. The Word Beyond The Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


April 17, 2007

Militarization of U.S. Foreign Relations with Latin America: Prospects for Change

Lisa Haugaard (Executive Director, Latin America Working Group)
Joy Olson (Executive Director, Washington Office on Latin America)
Adam Isaacson (Senior Associate, Center for International Policy)

A panel discussion from the Latin American Briefing Series.


April 12, 2007

The Current Security and Economic Situation on the Korean Peninsula

Alexander Vershbow (US Ambassador to the Republic of Korea)
Lee Tae-Sik (Republic of Korea Ambassador to the US)

Featuring a discussion with Alexander Vershbow, United States Ambassador to the Republic of Korea and Lee Tae-sik, Korean Ambassador to the United States. The Word Beyond The Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


April 3, 2017

The Rise and Fall of the Myth of the Mexican Revolution

Alan Knight (Professor of History, University of Oxford)

Prof. Knight is a scholar of modern history and politics in Latin America, especially Mexico. His research interests include revolutions, state-building and peasant movements, and British-U.S. relations with Latin America.


March 31, 2007

Baltimore Drowning: A Slavic Microhistory of Global Proportions

Keith Brown (Associate Professor, Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University)

This talk was the keynote address of "Rethinking Crossroads: Macedonia in Global Context." The conference assembled both young and established scholars whose social-scientifically and humanistically informed work speaks to the contemporary realities of the Republic of Macedonia as they continue to be reshaped by actors and processes from both within and without.


March 29, 2007

Why I Went to Iraq...Three Years Later

Noriaki Imai (Student environmental and peace activist)

At 18 years of age, Noriaki Imai traveled to Iraq to study the effects of depleted uranium on Iraqi children. While in Iraq, he was taken hostage and threatened to be killed unless Japan withdrew its troops from Iraq. Fortunately, he was released alive, but when he returned home to Japan, he faced enormous public criticism. Part of the Japan at Chicago Lecture Series: Celebrating Protest


March 6, 2007

Postwar Japan on the Brink: Militarism, Colonialism, Yasukuni Shrine

Tetsuya Takahashi (Tetsuya Takahashi, Professor of Philosophy, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo)

Professor Takahashi's writings, including his 2005 bestseller, The Yasukuni Issue, make unmistakably clear that the role of the Shrine is antithetical to democratic values in Japan and to reconciliation with Asia, which requires acknowledgment of the harms inflicted through colonialism and war. The subject of his lecture is Japan at a crossroads today, its hard-won postwar democratic values at stake as never before. This is the inaugural lecture of The Tetsuo Najita Distinguished Lecture Series in Japanese Studies.


March 2, 2007

Keynote Address: Environmental Challenges Across Asia

Alan Kolata (Neukom Family Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology, The University of Chicago)

There is little doubt that climate change, deforestation, erosion, and the unequal distribution of natural resources around the globe are of pressing importance everywhere, but these problems are perhaps most acute in Asia, home to 64 percent of the world's population. Much of this population (1 and 1.3 billion, respectively) is concentrated in India and China, two countries with rapidly growing economies, increasing levels of personal consumption, and serious ecological problems. Southeast Asia, though less populated overall, is home to some of the world's major rainforests and to significant biodiversity. Southeast Asian forests are disappearing at a rapid rate, in part as a consequence of resource demands from the first world. Understanding these human and environmental challenges requires detailed understandings of local histories and ecologies; in this symposium we introduce some of the major environmental challenges facing Asia today, focusing on some specific historical and cultural contexts in this diverse region.


March 2, 2007

Ecology, Human Rights, and Large Dam Projects in South Asia

Kathleen Morrison (Professor of Anthropology)

Part of the “Environmental Challenges Across Asia” symposium


March 2, 2007

Environmental Disaster in the Marshes of Southern Iraq

Josh Ellis (M.A. in Middle Eastern Studies and Public Policy, University of Chicago)

Part of the “Environmental Challenges Across Asia” symposium


February 23, 2007

Collateral Damage: Human Rights and U.S. Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

Samantha Power (Anna Lindh Professor of Practice of Global Leadership and Public Policy, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University)

Samantha Power's book, A Problem From Hell: America and the Age of Genocide, was awarded the 2003 Pulitzer Prize for general non-fiction. She was the founding executive director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, and covered the wars in the former Yugoslavia as a reporter for U.S. News and World Report, The Boston Globe and The Economist. Part of the Human Rights Distinguished Lecture Series.


February 19, 2007

Perspectives on Argentina

Juan Pablo Nicolini (President, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Argentina)

Third session of "Poverty & Growth: Reflections on Latin America,” a three-part workshop with Professor Juan Pablo Nicolini


February 12, 2007

Ending Global Poverty

Jeffrey Sachs (Professor of Sustainable Development and Health Policy and Management, Columbia University)

A lecture by Jeffrey Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute and Professor of Sustainable Development and Health Policy and Management at Columbia University and the author of The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time. The Word Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


February 8, 2007

Islam in America: A Conversation with Paul Barrett and Umar Abd-Allah

Paul Barrett (Investigative Journalist, Business Week)
Umar Abd-Allah (Scholar-in-Residence, Nawawi Foundation)

Paul Barrett and Dr. Umar Abd-Allah in a discussion of their recent works, American Islam: The Struggle for the Soul of a Religion and A Muslim in Victorian America. Dr. Abd-Allah's work is a biography of Alexander Russell Webb, one of the earliest American converts to Islam to achieve a modicum of fame. Mr. Barrett's book offers portraits of a number of contemporary American Muslims, demonstrating the complexity of the community and diversity of opinion within this community. The Word Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


February 5, 2007

Growth, Poverty, and Economic Development

Juan Pablo Nicolini (President, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Argentina)

Second session of "Poverty & Growth: Reflections on Latin America,” a three-part workshop with Professor Juan Pablo Nicolini


January 22, 2007

Growth: Evidence and Sources

Juan Pablo Nicolini (President, Universidad Torcuato Di Tella, Argentina)

First session of "Poverty & Growth: Reflections on Latin America,” a three-part workshop with Professor Juan Pablo Nicolini.


January 16, 2007

Nicaraguan Presidential Elections: Prospects for the Region

Alejandro Bendaña (Centro de Estudios Internacionales, Nicaragua)
Michel Gobat (Associate Professor of History, University of Iowa)
Rose Spalding (Professor of Political Science, DePaul University)

A panel discussion on NIcaragua’s recent presidential elections, hosted by the Center for Internaitonal Studies' Latin American Briefing Series.


January 11, 2007

Reading 'Legitimation Crisis' in Tehran

Danny Postel (Senior Editor, openDemocracy)

The Iran depicted in the headlines is a rogue state ruled by ever-more-defiant Islamic fundamentalists. Yet inside the borders, an unheralded transformation of a wholly different political bent is occurring. A "liberal renaissance," as one Iranian thinker terms it, is emerging in Iran, and in his pamphlet Reading 'Legitimation Crisis' in Tehran, Danny Postel charts the contours of the intellectual upheaval. The Word Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


November 13, 2006

Mexico's 2006 Presidential Elections and the Fragility of Democratic Institutions

François Prud'homme (El Colegio de Mexico)

A lecture on Mexico’s recent presidential elections by François Prud'homme, El Colegio de Mexico


November 13, 2006

Human Rights and the Arts: Guantanamo in the Theater

Gillian Slovo (Author)

A talk by Gillian Slovo, co-author of "Guantanamo: 'Honor-Bound to Defend Freedom.’” South African-born Gillian Slovo has published a family memoir and ten novels, including Ice Road, which was short-listed for the Orange Prize.


November 4, 2006

A Sentimental Essay in Three Scenes - With An Epilogue

C.M. Naim_ (Professor of South Asian Languages and Civilizations Emeritus, University of Chicago)

Keynote to the symposium: “One Hundred Years of All-India Muslim League.” Formed in 1906, the All-India Muslim League trained and groomed generations of Muslim leaders on local, national and international scales as it played pivotal roles in the two partitions of India and the creation of Pakistan and Bangladesh. In that regard, no history of nationalism in India can be written without due attention to the Muslim League. However, the history of AIML is of even more relevance in today's world. The oft-heard refrain about the lack of democracy and democratic practices in the Muslim world fails utterly to account for institutions like the Muslim League—an erasure which deserves a sustained critique through renewed attention to this organization's history of charted and documented practice of Muslim democracy in India


November 4, 2006

Law, Community and Society: Writing the Histories of Muslim League

David Gilmartin (Professor of History, North Carolina State University)

Part of the symposium: "One Hundred Years of All-India Muslim League.”


November 4, 2006

Shibli and Early Years of Muslim League

I.A. Zilli (Aligarh Muslim University)

Part of the symposium: "One Hundred Years of All-India Muslim League.”


November 2, 2006

Mexico's 2006 Presidential Elections and Challenges for the New Government

María Amparo Casar (Centro de Investigacíon y Docencia Económicas)

A lecture by María Amparo Casar, Centro de Investigacíon y Docencia Económicas, A.C.


October 26, 2006

Newsrooms in Conflict: Journalism and the Democratization of Mexico

Sallie Hughes (Assistant Professor, School of Communications, University of Miami)

Sallie Hughes' book, “Newsrooms in Conflict,” examines the dramatic changes within Mexican society, politics, and journalism that transformed an authoritarian media institution into many conflicting styles of journalism with very different implications for deepening democracy in the country. The Word Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies


October 17, 2006

Monsters to Destroy: Bush's War on Terror and Sin

Ira Chernus (Professor of Religious Studies, University of Colorado-Boulder)

In an ambitious effort to clarify a complicated issue, Ira Chernus tackles the question of why U.S. foreign policy aimed at building national strength and security has the paradoxical effect of making the country less safe and secure. His answer: The ''war on terror'' is based not on realistic appraisals of the causes of conflict, but rather on ''stories'' that neoconservative policymakers believe about human nature and a world divided between absolute good and absolute evil. The Word Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.


October 16, 2006

Right vs. Left & the Newborn Mexican Democracy: Can the the Three Survive?

Lorenzo Meyer (El Colegio de Mexico)

A lecture by Lorenzo Meyer, El Colegio de Mexico.


September 26, 2006

Blind Into Baghdad: America's War in Iraq

James Fallows (Editor, Atlantic Monthly)

Atlantic Monthly editor James Fallows discusses his new book, based on his award-winning series of articles for the magazine. Fallows analyzes the decision-making behind the Iraq war, and argues that the administration didn't fail to plan — it just ignored the plans of its own experts. Fallows also places the war within the larger context of the war on terror, arguing that the Iraqi venture has greatly undercut our global efforts to curtail terror attacks and the effectiveness of terrorist organizations. The Word Beyond the Headlines lecture series is a project of the University of Chicago Center for International Studies.