January 19, 2017 CFP

The Center for International Social Science Research (CISSR), a new initiative of the Division of the Social Sciences, invites University of Chicago faculty to submit proposals to join its inaugural cohort of Research Fellows for the 2017-2018 academic year. CISSR seeks to build a dynamic and inclusive community to serve as a destination for social scientists conducting research on global issues that cut across disciplinary, temporal, and geographic borders. We welcome internationally-oriented and empirically rigorous social science research projects from diverse theoretical and methodological approaches.

Applicants are encouraged to learn more about CISSR and the faculty fellows program by exploring the Center’s website or by contacting Manuel Viedma, CISSR Associate Director, via email at mviedma@uchicago.edu or by phone at (773) 834-3852.

Applications are due March 22, 2017. Application guidelines and a FAQ can be found via the tabs above.

Financial Support

CISSR provides up to $25,000 for one year of funding for faculty research projects at any stage of development. Funds may be used for a wide range of research-related activities, including field and archival research, purchasing data, arranging a book workshop, and organizing a conference for purposes of planning and ultimately publishing a special journal issue or edited volume. Proposals for visiting research collaborators may be integrated within the research project and we welcome proposals that include supplemental funding for the visitor while on sabbatical from their home institution.

Eligibility

University of Chicago faculty in any discipline or unit are encouraged to apply. Applicants are expected to explore an international topic using a social scientific lens. Projects should involve specified faculty from the Division of the Social Sciences as active collaboration or conversation partners.

CISSR seeks to support individual and collaborative research projects addressing contemporary and historical topics that will increase our knowledge and understanding of the world beyond the United States. Projects should be theoretically informed and empirically grounded, and should stand to benefit from critical dialogue across disciplinary, methodological, and geographic boundaries.

Requirements

Fellows are expected to participate in CISSR colloquia held twice a month and other periodic events, and to present their own research to the CISSR community once during their fellowship. To ensure participation, faculty fellows are required to be on campus for at least two of the Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters.

Applications

Applications must be submitted via fundingopportunities.uchicago.edu no later than 11:59pm CST on March 22, 2017. After logging in with a CNET ID, the application can be found by clicking the “view funding” button and is listed as “CISSR: Faculty Fellowships, 2017-18.” All applications require:

  1. An application form with a project title and 250-word abstract
  2. The CV(s) of the researcher(s)
  3. A 2-3-page project narrative
  4. A project budget with justifications
  5. A work plan for the fellowship year

View the Application Guidelines for complete details regarding the application process and formats for the narrative and budget. Applicants may also schedule a consultation during proposal development. Please contact Manuel Viedma at mviedma@uchicago.edu or (773) 834-3852 to set up an appointment.

I. CISSR Overview

The Center for International Social Science Research (CISSR) is a new initiative of the Division of the Social Sciences, the product of a faculty-led effort to reorganize the Center of International Studies and more effectively support the Division’s continued leadership in international and global affairs research. The Center promotes global inquiry among University of Chicago faculty and students through its Fellows program, book workshops, and other activities. CISSR operations are overseen by the Faculty Director, Dan Slater (Political Science), and an Advisory Board composed of faculty from across the University: Jenny Trinitapoli (Sociology), Emily Lynn Osborn (History), Paul Poast (Political Science), and Luis Martinez (Harris School of Public Policy).

II. CISSR Fellows Program

The CISSR Research Fellows Program is designed to bring social scientists who study different parts of the world using different methods and theoretical approaches together in a common space. Rooted in the belief that the best research is produced through critical and constructive conversations in an inclusive community of global scholars, CISSR activities allow fellows to share their findings, while also exposing them to new perspectives and localities. Through sustained interactions with their peers, and with CISSR financial and administrative support, fellows can mold their research and amplify its impact.

III. CISSR Fellow Support

CISSR provides up to $25,000 for one year of funding for faculty research projects at any stage. Funds may be used for a wide range of research-related activities, including field and archival research, purchasing data, bringing a research collaborator to campus as a visiting fellow, arranging a book workshop, and organizing a conference for purposes of planning and publishing a special journal issue or edited volume.

CISSR also provides comprehensive support throughout the cycle of its Fellows’ research initiatives. This includes administrative support (managing travel payments, honoraria, reimbursements, and the purchase of goods and services), administrative support for collaborating visiting fellows (arranging travel and housing, processing academic appointments, procuring office space), planning (event support for venues and accommodations), and project publicity (webpages, working papers, lectures, and social media).

IV. Eligibility and Requirements

University faculty in any discipline or unit are encouraged to submit a proposal. Applicants are expected to explore an international topic using a social scientific lens. Projects should involve specified faculty from the Division of the Social Sciences as active collaboration or conversation partners.

CISSR defines “international social science” broadly and inclusively, encompassing research that explores social phenomena beyond an American-focused context. We are looking for projects that address contemporary and historical topics and increase our knowledge of the world. Projects should involve the systematic examination of evidence, and scholars should be willing to entertain alternative arguments and different theoretical perspectives.

Faculty fellows are expected to participate in sustained dialogue with their CISSR colleagues, be on campus for at least two of the Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters to attend colloquia, and present their research projects at least once during their fellowship. Fellows are required to submit a report assessing the project’s success and CISSR’simpact at the end of their fellowship.

V. Pre-Proposal Consultations

Prospective faculty applicants are encouraged to consult with CISSR staff about the content and format of the proposal. Please contact Associate Director Manuel Viedma at 773-834-3852 or mviedma@uchicago.edu to arrange a consultation.

VI. Application Submission

Applications must be submitted via http://fundingopportunities.uchicago.edu/no later than 11:59 p.m. CST on March 22, 2017. All applications require an application form, the CV(s) of the researcher(s), a 2-3-page project narrative, a project budget with expense justifications, and a work plan for the fellowship year.

VII. Narrative Guidelines

The project narrative provides an intellectual justification for the project, describes the method or methods that will be employed, outlines the areas that will be examined, . If necessary, it also provides the justification for a visiting fellow. It should be 2-3 pages, single-spaced, and must include detailed descriptions of the following:

  1. The major research question(s) and the contribution to scholarship
    The research project should address an important question or topic of an international focus in the social sciences, and the project narrative should describe the critical contribution that the research will make to the social sciences.
  2. The research methodology
    The project narrative should describe the plan of work to advance the project’s research objectives by including a description of the research methodologies to be used and justifying the cases/areas that will be used for analysis.
    Projects that involve human subjects are not required to have IRB approval at the time of application submission. However, applicants are expected to have started the process of obtaining approval and successful applications will require the submission of an IRB approval or determination letter prior to the issuance of the award. Please see the Social & Behavioral Sciences Institutional Review Board for further details.
  3. The distinctive impact of support from CISSR and the importance of dialogue across disciplinary, geographical, and methodological boundaries to the project
    The project narrative should address how receiving a CISSR fellowship would make a substantial, distinctive impact on the research, and how the project will benefit from inclusion in the CISSR community.
  4. The anticipated results/goals of the project
    While CISSR does not expect a particular set of results from a research project, preference will be given to those projects that are likely to produce deliverables in the form of new data sets, publications, etc.
  5. Justification for Visiting Fellow (if necessary)
    Projects that intend to bring a visiting fellow to campus must include a justification for the visitor in the project narrative. Visiting fellows may be active research collaborators on the project or may be stand-alone visitors whose residency will advance CISSR’s mission. The project narrative should specify how the proposed visiting fellow will enhance the research project and what contributions the visitor can make to the CISSR community.
  6. Evidence of Collaboration/Conversation with Division of the Social Sciences Faculty (necessary if applicant does not have a Division of the Social Sciences appointment)
    Proposals from faculty outside of the Division of the Social Sciences require evidence that Social Science faculty are currently engaged in the project in some way. This can be as a co-investigator or as an ongoing conversation partner.

VIII. Budget and Expense Justification Guidelines

The budget presents the costs necessary to carry out the research activities described in the project narrative and consists of an itemized estimate of those costs. The budget must include justifications to describe how estimates were calculated and why they are necessary for the realization of project. Projects that propose expenses to cover an academic conference must make clear how the conference will result in publications in either in the form of a special journal issue or an edited volume.

Projects that intend to bring a visiting fellow to campus must include a budget for the visitor. CISSR welcomes proposals that include supplemental funding for a visitor while on sabbatical from their home institution. The budget for a visiting fellow must include travel, housing, and research-related expenses for the duration of their stay. International visitors may require additional costs related to visas and health insurance.

Support from CISSR cannot be used by University of Chicago faculty for course reduction, academic leave, or summer salary. CISSR is unable to fund postdoctoral researchers.

IX. Work Plan Guidelines

Participation by each fellow in CISSR’s activities and intellectual life is critical to the success of the program. To ensure that faculty fellows will be able to participate in colloquia and other events, a month-by-month work plan must be included with the application that details when the prospective fellow plans to be on campus and off for field work and other engagements. CISSR requires that faculty fellows be on campus and attend CISSR events for at least two of the Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters.

X. Review and Selection Process

The Faculty Director and Advisory Board of CISSR will evaluate proposals on the following criteria:

  • The originality of the proposed research;
  • Whether the project advances international social science by increasing our knowledge of different social systems on a vital topic of broad impact;
  • The quality of the design of the project activities, their feasibility, and the probability that they will lead to a successful realization of the project’s intellectual goals;
  • The reasonableness of the costs;
  • Whether CISSR support will make a clear and distinct impact on the project.



In this guide:

  1. CISSR Overview
  2. CISSR Fellows Program
  3. CISSR Fellow Support
  4. Eligibility and Requirements
  5. Pre-Proposal Consultations
  6. Application Submission
  7. Narrative Guidelines
  8. Budget Guidelines
  9. Work Plan Guidelines
  10. Review and Selection Process


Award Timeline
:
Proposals must be submitted by 11:59 PM CST on March 22, 2017. Applicants will be notified of decisions by mid-April 2017 and funding will become available to fellows beginning on July, 2017.

Questions:
Contact Manuel Viedma, CISSR Associate Director, at 773-834-3852 or mviedma@uchicago.edu.


Who is eligible to apply for a CISSR faculty fellowship?

University of Chicago faculty in any discipline or unit are encouraged to apply, provided they are exploring an international topic through a social science lens. Proposals originating from faculty outside of the Division of the Social Sciences must show evidence that Social Science faculty are currently engaged in the project in some way (i.e. as collaborators, co-investigators, or conversation partners).

Who is eligible for a CISSR doctoral residential fellowship?

Doctoral students who have defended their dissertation proposals (or the equivalent) from any University unit are eligible for a residential fellowship. Dissertation research must address an international topic and use a social scientific lens.

What is meant by ‘international social science’?

CISSR defines ‘international social science’ broadly and inclusively, encompassing research that explores social phenomena in places beyond an American-focused context. An international social science project will address an important contemporary or historical topic that affects a range of regions through a systematic examination of evidence.

Are projects required to be interdisciplinary, comparative or collaborative?

Projects are not required to be interdisciplinary, collaborative, comparative, mixed-method, or be based in a certain time period. Projects can be individual or collaborative endeavors that are situated within a single discipline, based in a single locality, and employ a single social science method. But we ask that fellows be open to alternative arguments and perspectives in order to improve research through dialogue across disciplinary, methodological, and geographical boundaries.

How will faculty proposals be evaluated?

The CISSR Faculty Director and Advisory Board will evaluate proposals based on the following criteria:
• The originality of the proposed research;
• Whether the project advances international social science by increasing our knowledge and understanding of different social systems on a vital topic of broad impact;
• The quality of the design of project activities, their feasibility, and probability that they will lead to the successful realization of the project’s intellectual goals;
• The reasonableness of the costs;
• Whether CISSR support will make a clear and distinct impact on the project.

How will doctoral proposals be evaluated?

The CISSR Faculty Director and Advisory Board will evaluate proposals based on the following criteria:
• The originality of the dissertation project;
• Whether the dissertation advances international social science by increasing our knowledge of different social systems and by addressing a vital topic of broad impact;
• The quality of project’s research design;
• Whether CISSR support will make a clear and distinct impact on the project.

What results does CISSR expect from faculty research projects?

While CISSR does not expect a particular set of results from a faculty research project, preference will be given to those projects that are likely to produce deliverables in the form of new data sets, publications, working papers, etc.

What results does CISSR expect from doctoral research projects?

CISSR does not expect results from doctoral research projects, but we do expect doctoral students to make a contribution to the Center’s intellectual life.

What is expected from CISSR faculty fellows during their fellowships?

Faculty fellows are expected to engage with their colleagues in sustained intellectual conversations and participate in colloquia and other Center events throughout two of the Autumn, Winter, and Spring academic quarters. They are also expected to present their research in the colloquia at least once during their fellowship. All fellows are required to submit a report assessing the project’s success and CISSR’s impact at the end of their fellowship.

What is expected from CISSR doctoral fellows during their fellowships?

Doctoral fellows are expected to contribute to intellectual life of the Center by participating in CISSR colloquia and events. They are also expected to work in the office the entire year of their fellowship and carry out fieldwork during breaks in the academic calendar. All fellows are required to submit a report assessing the project’s success and CISSR’s impact at the end of their fellowship.

How many CISSR fellowships are available for faculty and doctoral students?

The number of fellowships available depends on the yearly CISSR budget. For the 2017-18 fiscal year, CISSR has estimated it has enough funds for up to five faculty fellows, depending on the size of applicant budgets submitted and approved, and enough funds for up to five doctoral fellows.

Can CISSR projects receive funding elsewhere?

CISSR supports projects with financial support from other sources. In such cases, CISSR continues to expect that its support will have a clear and distinct impact on the project and that fellows will participate in the CISSR community.

How are CISSR research fellowships connected to CISSR book workshops?

Faculty fellows are eligible and encouraged to apply for book workshop funding as part of their research projects. CISSR has a separate book workshop program for university and non-university faculty who are not fellows.

Are project activities that occur off-campus eligible for support?

The CISSR research fellowship is meant to support University scholars in their research, including fieldwork. However, faculty fellows are required to be on campus for two of the Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters. Public programming activities such as lectures and conferences related to the project that will occur off campus or abroad are encouraged to find support for those activities elsewhere and from other entities like the centers in Beijing, Paris, Delhi, etc.

What kinds of scholarly conferences are most likely to receive approval and support?

A faculty fellowship proposal will most likely receive administrative support and funding for a conference when the fellow has a clear plan for a producing a publication out of conference proceedings in the form of a special journal issue or edited volume.

Can a faculty member participate in multiple projects at the same time?

There is no limit to the number of CISSR projects an individual faculty member may participate in at any given time. Collaboration and cross-pollination are encouraged.

What about projects that require IRB approval?

Projects that involve human subjects are not required to have IRB approval at the time of application submission. However, if the project is successful and selected for funding, the fellow(s) is required to submit an IRB approval or determination letter to CISSR prior to the issuance of an award. Please see the Institutional Review Board for further details.

What costs should be included in the project budget?

The budget is an opportunity to present the costs necessary to carry out the described research activities. A budget should include an itemized estimate of costs and all costs should be necessary to the accomplish the project objectives and reasonable in relation to expected outcomes. Justifications for costs and descriptions of how estimates were calculated should also be included.

Can postdoctoral or student researchers be supported with CISSR funds?

Because CISSR’s ability to fully fund researchers is very limited, it is not able to support postdoctoral and professional research assistants, though it may approve the use of student research assistance in some instances. Fellows interested in hiring research assistance are encouraged to explore other potential sources of support to augment their budgets.

How will the CISSR visiting fellows program work?

CISSR is interested in bringing the collaborators of faculty fellows, or a visitor whose residency will advance CISSR’s mission, to campus to join its community of scholars. Faculty fellows who wish to propose a visiting fellow must include a justification in the project narrative and the costs of a visiting fellow’s stay in their budget. The costs for domestic visiting fellows include travel expenses to bring them to campus, housing for the duration of their stay, and any other research-related expenses. Budgets for international visitors may require additional costs related to obtaining a visa and health insurance. CISSR will provide administrative support for visiting fellows by arranging their travel, finding them housing, and processing their academic appointments.